Five Things About People

5 Things

#1 – Everybody wants to be somebody. Every single person on the face of the earth has been wonderfully created in the image of God. Sin has distorted that image and our job as the church is to help people reconnect with a sense of self-worth. God is establishing his kingdom and the subjects of that kingdom are called to empower others the way they themselves have been empowered. Fact is, everybody wants to accomplish something. Everybody wants their life to matter. People want to have some sense of value; and they certainly want to be affirmed. Identity is often misplaced in this world. People define themselves based on “what they do” or “what they’ve done wrong.” They often live with shame, guilt, and condemnation. Good news: Everybody is somebody, and what makes you somebody is not current circumstances, past mistakes, or other people’s shifting opinions. What makes you somebody is God’s eternal love for you… You are a much-loved child of the King.


#2 – Nobody cares how much you know until they know how much you care. Relationships matter. Let me explain, once at a luncheon a man came to me and some of my staff and said, “Anytime you guys want to pick my brain about ministry, just give me a call.” We didn’t know this person very well; he wasn’t even in ministry. Yet, he was very proud of all of his supposed knowledge. Needless to say, we weren’t interested. If you want to touch people and change lives, you have to touch them relationally first. Don’t tell them what you know, instead let them know that you care. You don’t impress people with your knowledge; you impress them with your compassion.


#3 – Everybody that belongs to the Body of Christ belongs to everybody that belongs to the Body of Christ. Just like the different parts of our body need the other parts to function properly, so too we need each other. To put it another way: Everybody needs somebody. John Wesley said, “Christianity is essentially a social religion… to turn it into a solitary religion, is indeed to destroy it.” Every so often, I come across someone who says, “I don’t need anybody… I’m a self-made man (or woman).” When people tell me this, they think I’m going to applaud their accomplishments. My reaction is just the opposite: I pity them. Ultimately, you can’t achieve greatness alone. We were created social beings and are designed to be part of the Body. We need each other. For that reason, if you’ve done something all by yourself, you haven’t done much at all.


#4 – Anybody who helps somebody influences a lot of somebodies. Compassion literally means, “To suffer with.” Not many are willing to engage downward mobility; we naturally aspire for upward momentum. In other words, we don’t enjoy getting involved in other people’s messy lives. Aren’t you glad God didn’t think twice about getting involved in your life? Christ calls us to a life of service. When you help someone, you’re not only helping that person. Either directly or indirectly, you’re also helping everyone within that person’s sphere of influence. The power of influence always adds and multiplies. And influence that impacts the world happens when we serve.


#5 – God loves everybody. Valuing every person is vital. Learning to see people’s worth so we can teach them to see it themselves changes lives. Helping people cultivate their potential in Christ creates a new sense of identity. Pointing out that God loves everybody makes a large impact in the world. You see, God loves you in spite of your disobedience, weakness, and selfishness. God loves you enough to provide a way to experience abundant, eternal life through faith in Christ. God desires every person to rise up and become the special somebody that he originally designed them to be. Helping people discover their potential in Christ is part of our commission. You matter. Yes You. Your name is significant. Nobody can replace you. No one else can play your part. And God loves you.


(Sources: John C. Maxwell; Leadership Wired; Jamie Tworkowski; TWLOHA)

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